Insanity on the water

Posted in News, Motorsport

If you’ve never seen jet-sprint racing up close and personal, then you’re missing out one of the best forms of spectator-friendly motorsport available. Regardless of whether you’re a boat fan or not, the chance to see these (sometimes) 1500-plus horsepower machines in action is one not to be missed.

For the last few years, ASB Baypark Stadium in Tauranga has had its usually pristine turf dug up to allow for a temporary track to be constructed — and that’s set to happen all over again on January 29 and 30 for the Enzed 2016 UIM Jetsprint World Championship. The round two / finals weekend sees Friday, January 29 feature practice and qualifying, while Saturday, January 30 is where you’ll see up to 60 boats from around the globe giving it everything they've got in full race mode.

Round one will be held the weekend prior to this on Sunday, January 24 and sees the boats hit the water at the equally as popular Meremere Sprint Bowl. The venue features a unique natural amphitheatre — just the thing for taking the family and kicking back with a picnic. Round one is only open to the public on Sunday, with the race day kicking off at 11am and running through to 6pm.

While the Suzuki Unlimited Superboats class features the machinery with massive horsepower — including that from blown big blocks, quad rotors, and even 700ci naturally aspirated small blocks — the Altherm Group A and Biolytix Group jetboats provide the same spectacle.

The World Championship Series won’t be returning to New Zealand waters until 2022, so this is the best chance you’ll get to see the thrills and spills of true world-class racing for many years.

Tickets are available from Eventfinda 

Buy now online and you can secure your seat, save $10–$20 on gate prices, and enter the online competition to win a Suzuki Swift*. Visit

*Terms and conditions apply

Todd Wylie

Todd Wylie has been involved with NZV8 magazine since before the first issue was printed, and has been the editor for the last eight years. Growing up in the heyday of the Jap-import scene, he's not adverse to Japanese vehicles, having worked for NZ Performance Car previously, as well as owning a few well-known examples. These days he cruises at a slower pace in a 1956 Cadillac Coupe and dreams of building a Model A tudor.