If you're a follower of the Demon Energy D1NZ National Drifting Championship then no doubt you will have heard the announcement made at the CRC Speedshow, over the weekend of July 16–17, that the 2016–’17 season will kick off in Dunedin at the Forsyth Barr Stadium for the first time. If you're like me and have no interest in the ‘national game’ then you'll probably not know that the stadium is usually home to rugby, not drifting. In fact it's a very unusual venue for drifting as it's indoors — under a 12-storey-high glass roof! But then again, this is drifting — the sport that continues to push the boundaries of traditional motorsport. 

It will be the first event of its kind in the southern hemisphere — the kind of event that is not to be missed. With the stadium's 24,000-seat capacity, and a purpose-built track smack bang in the middle, it's going to be close-quarters carnage! Check out D1NZ's video below for a full rundown.

Here are a few videos of similar events from around the world that should help explain just how damn cool this is going to be. 

The World Drift Series in China has been building these custom bespoke tracks for a few years now — even a good handful of Kiwi drivers have competed on them. The best thing about tracks like these is the great visibility and close quarters, and, above all else, the sound that echoes off the walls. Drifting has never sounded so good. 

The IDC took things to a new level with their super-close-quarters competition round inside a very compact stadium. This made for one hell of a carnage-filled show. 

See you all in Dunedin in five months' time. With three night rounds, including a teams event, there is no doubt that drifting remains the motorsport pushing the boundaries in New Zealand, bringing new and exciting shows for us to enjoy — bring it on!

Marcus Gibson

Marcus Gibson has spent his life getting a little grease under his fingernails growing up with a fascination for all things loud, fast, and low. Growing up during the boom of the import scene, the last ten years have seen him work for a few publications, as well as running his own website before taking up a role at NZ Performance Car in 2011. Marcus is as at home with a keyboard or camera in-hand as he is getting dirty in his workshop or at the track, championing that Kiwi DIY attitude.